Movie time, and John Oliver

Movie time, and John Oliver

Usually when I tell someone I am writing about food waste reduction on my blog, he or she immediately thinks of restaurants donating excess to the local food bank or how much gets pitched from the household fridge in the normal course of a week. A quick survey of #NoFoodWasted shows a preponderance of tweets on creative ways to use leftovers and heaping love on ugly fruits and vegetables—no surprises here, we’re used to talking about food waste on the consumer level.

But as I mentioned at the outset, I want to raise awareness about food waste reduction throughout the supply chain—because the implications for food security and the environment are great. And because a lot of it is relevant to some lifelong idiosyncrasies: As I said in an earlier post, I’m an inveterate recycler of stuff. As for food, if there were a prize for eating the oldest leftovers, I’m sure I’d win hands down—and nary an upset stomach, ever. (I know, TMI.)

For another, more supply-chainy angle on food waste, I highly recommend watching the award-winning Just Eat It—a story of food waste told in a way that’s entertaining and mindboggling at the same time. For six months documentarians Grant Baldwin and Jenny Rustemeyer collected and ate only food that was discarded or soon to be (except for when they were invited for dinner).

Or you can watch the inimitable John Oliver go to town on the topic. If it weren’t so sobering, I’d be tempted to say it’s 17.5 minutes of sidesplitting fun. Of course Oliver’s mission is to raise awareness; any way he does it is fine with me.